Grants for unpublished writers 2018

This post is part of Flypaper’s Home Recording Week, where we’re sharing tips and insights from our community on home recording and production workflow. Read our featured articles here, or sign up for our weekly newsletter to make sure you never miss a beat!

A simple tip for making more engaging tracks is to add or subtract an element every four to eight bars or so. Here are a few variation approaches to try:

Lots of times we think the best practice should feel easy, when the opposite is actually true. I remember this point coming up a lot in the another useful rundown of effective practice techniques, the book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning. The authors talk about “desirable difficulties” — basically, by practicing in such a way that feels difficult rather than easy you facilitate more long-term learning.

Grants for new nonprofits

Berg was obsessed with numerology and symbolism. Lulu is accordingly littered with geometric expressions of human themes as above. The most notorious example of this obsession comes into play during the piece’s famous musical palindrome, hinging at bar 687 of the score.

With all of Logic’s inredible instruments, producers often rely on the sound of the samples right out of the box, here’s how to make them more interesting.

So far, we’ve kept to pretty mainstream pop tunes, but when we start to move away from those, things can get murky pretty quickly. For instance, while verses and choruses might be easy to recognize in a big pop anthem, how they function in an electronic dance song might not be as clear. Or how would you describe the form of something like “A Day in the Life” by The Beatles? It’s basically two entirely separate songs smashed together, so there’s no obvious “verse” or “chorus” section. Same thing with Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode,” but for three songs’ worth!

Both the principle producer, Tarik “Cilvaringz” Azzougarh, and the group have gone to great lengths to make sure no leaks are possible. Firstly, and courageously, they recorded everyone’s tracks to bpm-synced substitute beats (the performers hadn’t even heard the final beats until the record was mixed), deleted the source tracks and final mixes from all known hard-drives, and hid the album in a number of secure institutional locations around the world.

And what better way to kick off this revolutionary new television outlet than to air the newly minted music video for the Buggles’ song, “Video Killed the Radio Star” at 12:01 AM on August 1st, 1981, in all its glorious irony?

Music is revolution foundation

This is an alternate picking exercise that I used to build speed early on in my career. It’s incredibly effective, and you can employ the concept in your soloing. It’s called “modal alternate picking.”

Let’s say that you’re mixing a project and it’s arrived to you with phase issues built-in. You have a natural snare recording, but when you turn up the accompanying trigger track, it sounds awful. Usually it’s the above comb-filtering and/or a disturbing lack of low end. You can start by flipping the phase button, and see if that gets you where you need to be. Alternatively, you can zoom in on the waveforms and see what’s up.

Phase also operates more deeply within the architecture of signal processing, itself. A vintage analog EQ unit uses capacitors and inductors to shift the phase of the signal passing through it. And the same goes for most digital equalizers, many of which are designed to model the distinct and desirable characteristics of those good ol’ analog boxes. There are linear phase EQs available digitally that do not function using phase shifting, but they are a relatively special case.

Sometimes, I’ll mention “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and someone in the room will just start singing the chorus immediately. Part of that has to do with this melodic context stuff and the tonal hierarchy of certain notes that dominate that section, but it also has to do with other stuff like lyrical repetition in the chorus, tonal resolution, the rhythm and meter, and even with personal memories we might attribute to that song. Cognitive science can explain a portion of this, but not all of it, as Cui is sure to mention.

Another bonus of recording this way is having separated audio files between you and your guest. If they cough while you’re talking, you can cleanly remove it from their track without affecting your voice.